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Malaysia Says Files Were Deleted From Flight Simulator



KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) -- Investigators are trying to restore files deleted last month from the home flight simulator of the pilot aboard the missing Malaysian plane to see if they shed any light on the disappearance, Malaysia's defense minister said Wednesday.

Hishammuddin Hussein told a news conference that the pilot, Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah, is considered innocent until proven guilty of any wrongdoing. He said members of Zaharie's family are cooperating in the investigation.

On The WBEN Liveline :  CBS's Barnaby Lo in Kuala Lumpur
 

 

The missing Malaysian plane is a made-for-TV mystery where the public's hunger for the story seems inversely proportional to the amount of solid leads for solving the case.


When it comes to coverage of the missing plane, where do you weigh in?
I can't get enough! I follow all the twists and turns!
( 7% )
I'm staying up to date.
( 41% )
I don't want to hear about it until 'something' is FOR SURE!
( 52% )
 

The story led ABC's "Good Morning America" again Tuesday, when Bob Woodruff reported from a Malaysian fishing village, interviewing a man who said he saw a jet flying low over the water around the time Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went missing.  Anchor George Stephanopoulos immediately brought in aviation expert Stephen Ganyard, who dismissed the eyewitness account as essentially worthless.

The circular passage typifies a story where clues and theories come to light and are passed over or debunked - the stolen passports, the oil slick on the water, the seismic event, lithium batteries - leaving people still searching for both a jetliner and the truth.

"The information coming in from the Malaysian authorities has been, literally, all over the map," a frustrated Anderson Cooper said on CNN.

Yet long-struggling CNN, Cooper's nightly newscast in particular, has been among the biggest beneficiaries of public interest in the story. Since the plane went missing  and CNN began nearly wall-to-wall coverage, its prime-time ratings have jumped 68 percent over the year's average. Twice last week, Cooper's show more than doubled its typical audience.

Rival Fox News Channel, which is also covering the story and topped all cable networks in prime-time ratings last week, found time to discuss whether CNN is covering it too much.

Seventeen of the 20 most popular articles on the BBC's website last week were about the plane.

The number of Twitter messages about the plane peaked at nearly 1 million per day shortly after it went missing, with daily tweets in the 200,000 to 400,000 range much of last week, the social media site said.

"It's a macabre story but still fascinating," said former NBC News aviation correspondent Robert Hager, who retired in 2004 yet was called in by the network to help when he was vacationing in Alaska.

Files containing records of the simulations carried out on the program were deleted on Feb. 3, Malaysian police chief Khalid Abu told the news conference.

 Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 with 239 people aboard went missing March 8 on a night flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Malaysian authorities have not ruled out any possible explanations, but have said the evidence so far suggests the flight was deliberately turned back across Malaysia to the Strait of Malacca. They are unsure what happened next.

Investigators have identified two giant arcs of territory spanning the possible positions of the plane about 7 1/2 hours after takeoff, based on its last faint signal to a satellite. The arcs stretch up as far as Kazakhstan in central Asia and down deep into the southern Indian Ocean.

Police are considering the possibility of hijacking, sabotage, terrorism or issues related to the mental health of the pilots or anyone else on board, and have asked for background checks from foreign agencies on all foreign passengers.

Hishammuddin said background checks have been received for all the foreigners except those from Ukraine and Russia - which account for three passengers. He said none of the checks has turned up anything suspicious.

Relatives of passengers on the missing airliner have grown increasingly frustrated over the lack of progress in the search after 12 days. Planes sweeping across vast expanses of the Indian Ocean and satellites peering on Central Asia have turned up no new clues in the hunt.

"It's really too much. I don't know why it is taking so long for so many people to find the plane. It's 12 days," Subaramaniam Gurusamy, 60, said in an interview from his home on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur. His 34-year-old son, Pushpanathan Subramaniam, was on the flight heading to Beijing for a work trip.

"He's the one son I have," Subaramaniam said.

Before Wednesday's news briefing at a hotel near the Kuala Lumpur airport, Chinese relatives of passengers held up a banner and started shouting at the venue before police escorted them out


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