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POLL: Majority Upstate Opposes SAFE Act; Cuomo Popular But...



(WBEN/AP) - A year after the SAFE Act gun-control law was enacted, voters support it by a 2-to-1 margin statewide, but a slight majority of upstaters still oppose the measure, according to a poll that also shows some slippage in Gov. Andrew Cuomo's popularity.

Cuomo's rating is down slightlly in thee latest Siena Poll, but he still leads Rob Astorino, the only declared Republican candidate for governor, by 35 points. READ THE ENTIRE POLL Question By Question HERE or The Siena Summary Below

The survey released Monday by Siena College shows Cuomo leading the Westchester County executive 61-26 percent, down from 64-22 percent last month.

On gun control, opposition to the SAFE Act seems to be concentrated among Republicans (54 percent oppose- 39 in favor), Conservatives (51 percent oppose- 41 percent in favor ) and upstaters (52 percent oppose-45 percent in favor) , according to Pollster Steve Greenberg.

"While overall, New Yorkers support the SAFE Act by a two-to-one margin, there are some stark differences based on partisanship and geography. Three-quarters of Democrats and a majority of independents support the law, while a majority of Republicans oppose it. The law is supported by more than three-quarters of New York City voters and almost two-thirds of downstate suburban voters, while a slim majority of upstaters oppose it,” Greenberg said in a prepared statement (below) . “While a majority of men and white voters support the gun law, even stronger majorities of women, black and Latino voters support it.”

Voters say Cuomo has been an effective governor by a 64-28 percent margin.Voters support Cuomo's proposal for state-funded college for prison inmates by a 53-43 percent margin.

A plurality of voters, 47-43 percent, said a Republican can beat Cuomo in this election.

The telephone poll of 813 registered voters conducted March 16-20 has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.4 percentage points.


 
 From The Siena Research Institute.. Here's the entire announcement verbatim:

Governor Andrew Cuomo leads Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, the only declared Republican candidate for governor, 61-26 percent (down from 64-22 percent last month). There was slippage as well in Cuomo’s job performance and generic ‘re-elect’ ratings, according to a Siena College Poll of New York voters released today. By a 64-28 percent margin, voters say Cuomo has been an effective governor.

However, on seven of a series of eight issues, only between 15 and 26 percent of voters said that issue has improved since Cuomo’s been governor, while between 24 and 45 percent of voters said it has gotten worse.

A year after its enactment, New Yorkers support the SAFE Act by a two-to-one margin. Voters also support the governor’s proposal to have the state fund college classes for inmates by a 53-43 percent margin. A majority oppose the New York Dream Act 56-39 percent (up from 53-44 percent in January 2013).

“This Siena College poll provides both good news and bad news for both Cuomo and Astorino. For the governor, the good news is that he maintains a strong 35-point lead over his likely challenger, he continues to have a strong  favorability rating and almost two-thirds of voters think he’s been an effective governor,” said Siena College pollster Steven Greenberg. “The bad news for him is that his job performance rating is the lowest it’s been since November, and for the first time, only a plurality – not a majority – of voters are prepared to re-elect him.”

Cuomo’s favorability rating is 58-34 percent (60-35 percent last month) and his job performance rating fell from 48-51 percent last month to 46-54 percent today. By a 49-41 percent margin voters say they are prepared to reelect Cuomo compared to preferring ‘someone else’ (down from 54-37 percent last month). Astorino has a 17-19  percent favorability rating, with 65 percent having no opinion (from 11-15-73 percent last month).

“For Astorino the good news is that a plurality of voters – 47-43 percent – voters thinks a Republican can beat Cuomo in this election, and the bad news is that he remains unknown to two-thirds of voters and among those who know him slightly more view him unfavorably than favorably,” Greenberg said.

“Although by a better than two-to-one margin voters say Cuomo has been an effective governor, on only one out of eight issues are more New Yorkers prepared to say things have improved rather than have gotten worse. On six of the eight, a majority or plurality says things have  remained about the same, however, on two – the quality of public education and the economic well-being of most New Yorkers – a plurality says things have gotten worse,”  Greenberg said.

“To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, do New Yorkers think they’re better off economically now than they were four years ago? Only 19 percent say they are, and they support Cuomo over Astorino 82-12 percent. Among the majority, 52 percent, who say they are the same economically, they favor Cuomo 66-23 percent. And the 28 percent who say they are worse off economically today? They only side with Astorino by a narrow 41-38 percent margin,” Greenberg said.

One Year Later, SAFE Act Continues to Be Strongly Supported by New York Voters
Sixty-three percent of voters support the SAFE Act, compared to 32 percent who oppose it. One year ago, in March 2013, voters supported the then new gun law by a 61-35 percent margin. “While overall, New Yorkers support the SAFE Act by a two-to-one margin, there are some stark differences based on partisanship and geography. Three-quarters of Democrats and a majority of independents support the law, while a majority of Republicans oppose it. The law is supported by more than three-quarters of New York City voters and almost two-thirds of downstate suburban voters, while a slim majority of upstaters oppose it,” Greenberg said. “While a majority of men and white voters support the gun law, even stronger majorities of women, black and Latino voters support it.”

Cuomo’s Push for College Classes for Inmates Has Majority Support
“There is a very strong partisan and geographic split on the governor’s proposal to fund college classes for prison inmates. Two-thirds of Democrats support it, while two-thirds of Republicans oppose it, and independents are divided down the middle. More than 70 percent of New York City voters support it, as do a majority of downstate suburbanites, however, two-thirds of upstaters oppose the idea,” Greenberg said.  “A majority of white voters oppose funding college classes for inmates but it enjoys support from three-quarters of Latino voters and more than 80 percent of black voters, as well as two-thirds of Jewish voters,” Greenberg  said. “Younger voters strongly support it, while older voters are evenly divided.”



New York Dream Act Opposed by Strong Majority
“Although a majority of Democrats supports the Dream Act in New York, a stronger majority of independents opposes it, as do more than 80 percent of Republicans. Similarly, a small majority of New York City voters supports it, a larger majority of downstate suburban voters opposes it and more than two-thirds of upstaters oppose it. A majority of Latino and black voters supports the Dream Act, while white voters oppose it two-toone,”  Greenberg said. “And although it passed the Assembly and narrowly failed in the Senate, support for the Dream Act is actually down from last year when opposition was only nine points higher than support. Now opposition is 17 points higher than support.”

Voters Don’t View Legislature Favorably but They Like Their Legislators

The Assembly has a negative 39-46 percent favorability rating (up slightly from 37-49 percent last month). Voters view their own assemblymember favorably 52-23 percent (virtually unchanged from 52-24 percent in May 2013). The Senate’s favorability rating is negative 39-49 percent (up slightly from 37-51 percent last month), while voters favorably view their own senator 59-26 percent (virtually unchanged from 59-28 percent in May 2013). “Voters don’t like the Legislature but they do like their own legislators. And while there is a clear difference in the partisan leadership of each house, that difference does not materialize in the way each house is viewed. Democrats have a slightly favorable view of both the Senate and the Assembly, while Republicans and independents have a decidedly more unfavorable view of both houses,”  Greenberg said. “By a narrow 41-36 percent margin, voters say they are prepared to re-elect their assemblymember and by a wider 48-36 percent margin they say they are prepared to re-elect their senator.”

Voters See State on the Right Track – Barely; See Country More Strongly Headed in Wrong Direction
By a 46-43 percent margin, voters say New York is on the right track, compared to headed in the wrong direction (down from 48-40 percent last month). The United States is headed in the wrong direction 57-36 percent (up from 55-39 percent last month). “A majority of Democrats and City voters, as well as a plurality of downstate suburban voters say the state is on the right track. However, a majority of Republicans and upstaters and a plurality of independents don’t like the direction the state is headed in,” Greenberg said. “When it comes to the direction of the country, a bare majority of Democrats say it’s headed on the right track, while a majority of independents and more than 80 percent of  Republicans say the country is headed in the wrong direction.”

This Siena College Poll was conducted March 16-20, 2014 by telephone calls to 813 New York State registered voters. It has an overall margin of error of + 3.4 percentage points. Data was statistically adjusted by age, party, region and gender to ensure representativeness. Sampling was conducted via random digit dialing to landline and cell phones weighted to reflect known population patterns. The Siena College Research

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Locations : New YorkNew York City
People : Andrew CuomoRob AstorinoRonald ReaganSteven Greenberg
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