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The Oscars Selfie Sent Round the World.. And Short Pants?



  Yes, " 12 Years a Slave"  Won Best Picture at Sunday Night's Academy Awards. 
But here's two other pictures getting a lot of buzz.


Ellen DeGeneres' goal of setting a retweet record with her star-studded selfie was achieved before the Oscars telecast was even over.  During a comic bit, the Oscars host prevailed upon actor Bradley Cooper to take a picture with her and several other stars crowding around, including Meryl Streep, Jennifer Lawrence, Kevin Spacey, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt.

ABOVE:  This image released by Ellen DeGeneres shows actors, front row from left, Jared Leto, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Ellen DeGeneres, Bradley Cooper, Peter Nyong’o Jr. and, second row, from left, Channing Tatum, Julia Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Brad Pitt, Lupita Nyong’o and Angelina Jolie as they  pose for a "selfie" portrait on a cell phone. (AP Photo/Ellen DeGeneres

COMPLETE OSCAR COVERAGE: Pharell Williams's Short Pants | The Complete Winners List | Scenes They Should've Cut | Diversity Wins

Long before midnight Sunday, the photo had been retweeted more than 2 million times, breaking a record set by President Barack Obama with the picture of him hugging First Lady Michelle Obama after his re-election in 2012.

Twitter also sent out an apology because all of the retweeting disrupted service for more than 20 minutes after 10 p.m. ET.
 


Meanwhile... What Was Pharell Williams Thinking?

  Musician Pharrell Williams (L) and wife Helen Lasichanh attend the Oscars held at Hollywood & Highland Center on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images)


 

And The Winners Are.....

Best Picture:
"12 Years a Slave." 


Actor: Matthew McConaughey, 
"Dallas Buyers Club."  


Actress: Cate Blanchett, 
"Blue Jasmine."  


Supporting Actor: Jared Leto, 
"Dallas Buyers Club." 


Supporting Actress: Lupita Nyong'o, 
"12 Years a Slave." 


Directing: Alfonso Cuaron, 
"Gravity."  


Foreign Language Film:  "The Great Beauty," Italy.  

Adapted Screenplay: John Ridley,
"12 Years a Slave."  


Original Screenplay: Spike Jonze,
"Her."  


Animated Feature Film:  "Frozen."  

Production Design:  "The Great Gatsby."  

Cinematography:  "Gravity."  

Sound Mixing: "Gravity."  

S
ound Editing: "Gravity."  

Original Score:  "Gravity,"
Steven Price. 


Original Song:  "Let It Go" from "Frozen."  

Costume:  "The Great Gatsby."  

Makeup and Hairstyling: "Dallas Buyers Club."  

Animated Short Film:  "Mr. Hublot."  

Documentary Feature: "20 Feet from Stardom."  

Documentary (short subject):
"The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life."  


Film Editing: "Gravity."  

Live Action Short Film: "Helium."  

Visual Effects: "Gravity."  

Honorary Oscars:  

Peter W. Anderson, 
Film-processing labs over past century 
Angelina Jolie for humanitarian work
Angela Lansbury, 

Steve Martin
Director
Piero Tosi.

 

Great Scenes from the Oscar Telecast... And some that should have been edited out

AP Critic Frazier Moore reviews a night that t had its high moments and a bare minimum of deficits, easily catalogued in cinematic terms: Great scene! Or ... best left on the cutting-room floor.

- Great Scene: The show's kickoff, which, unlike so many years before, wasn't an extravagant comedic film featuring the host with a bevy of stars, but instead, found DeGeneres arriving on stage to deliver her simple, but satisfyingly funny, monologue.

In gently wry style, she ribbed celebs in the hall as well as show biz in general. (The nominees, she declared, had collectively made over 1,400 films, "and you've gone to a total of six years of college.")

Then she brought on the first presenter. Brisk and efficient.

After that, she kept the energy flowing through a broadcast predictably sparse in surprises among those who won. Unlike many hosts, she was a regular presence, at one moment gathering stars in the audience for a group selfie to tweet, at another bringing in a pizza delivery guy to share slices with audience members (and then confessing she had no money to pay the bill: "Where's Harvey Weinstein?").

DeGeneres did what any host should do: Stay involved and make sure everyone has fun.

At the same time, she seemed to be committed to an unspoken theme for the evening: Humanize Hollywood's glitterati for the viewers. In return, the stars were on their best behavior.

- Great Scene: Best supporting actor (for "Dallas Buyers Club") Jared Leto's acceptance speech paid tribute to his mother, thanking her "for teaching me to dream," then celebrated the dreams "in places like the Ukraine and Venezuela" - before pledging his support to those who have felt injustice "because of who you are or who you love." He was the night's first winner, and, in accepting his trophy, also pulled off a humanistic hat trick.

- For the Cutting-Room Floor: The ironic spectacle of veteran actress Kim Novak, who was a presenter in the category of animation but, at age 81, revealed an eerily baby-smooth face that seemed frozen in place.

- Great Scene: Musical number with Pharrell Williams performing his nominated song, "Happy."

- Great Scene: U2 performing their nominated song, "Ordinary Love."

- Great Scene: Pink performing "Over the Rainbow" against panoramic clips from "The Wizard of Oz" in a salute to that beloved film's 75th anniversary.

- Great Scene: A particularly moving presentation of the In Memoriam roll, free of distracting applause from the audience. After the faces and names of the departed had been seen, Bette Midler sang the evocative "Wind Beneath My Wings."

- For the Cutting-Room Floor: Superfluous remarks from the president of the Academy, a mission statement whose pace-arresting effect was underscored by DeGeneres a moment later when she cracked, "Good luck following that, Amy Adams and Bill Murray!"

- Great Scene: The heartfelt acceptance spilling out of best supporting actress Lupita Nyong'o ("12 Years a Slave"), who made it clear she understood that "so much joy in my life is thanks to so much pain in someone else's."

- For the Cutting-Room Floor: The format of introducing the nine best-picture nominees, bunched in groups of threes, giving each film short shrift. Isn't there a better way of giving viewers a fitting sense of these contenders, which, after all, are the heart of what the Oscars is all about?

- Great Scene: The evening's finale, a joyous reception for best picture winner "12 Years a Slave."

All in all, a sleek show was the Oscarcast. Few bombshells, fewer embarrassments, from fade-in to fade-out. Then, in cinematic terms, that was a wrap

 



 Diversity was perhaps the biggest winner at the 86th annual Academy Awards.

For the first time, a film directed by a black filmmaker - Steve McQueen of "12 Years a Slave" - won best picture and a Latino - Alfonso Cuaron of "Gravity" - took home best director in a ceremony presided over by a lesbian host and overseen by the academy's first black president.

McQueen's grimly historical drama "12 Years a Slave" took best picture, leading the usually sedate filmmaker to jump up and down in celebration after his acceptance speech.

The British director dedicated his award to "all of the people who endured slavery and the 21 million people who still suffer slavery today."

Cuaron's lost-in-space thriller "Gravity" led the Oscars with seven awards, including cinematography, editing, score, visual effects, sound mixing and sound editing. Some in his native Mexico have been critical that since the attention came for a Hollywood release and not a Mexican-themed film, his win didn't have the same kind of importance.

"I'm Mexican so I hope some Mexicans were rooting for me," he told reporters backstage.

The entire Oscar ceremony had the feel of a make-over for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - an institution that has sometimes seemed stuck in the past. After a Los Angeles Times report revealed the academy was overwhelming older white men, new president Cheryl Boone Isaacs has pushed for a more varied membership.

The movie industry that the Oscars reflect has also been reluctant to tell a wider range of stories.

"Dallas Buyers Club," the best picture-nominated drama about AIDS in 1980s Texas, took two decades to get made after countless executives balked at financing such a tale. Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto won best actor and best supporting actor for their roles in the film as a heterosexual rodeo rat (McConaughey) and a transgender drug addict (Leto) united by HIV.

"Thirty-six million people who have lost the battle to AIDS and to those of you out there who have ever felt injustice because of who you are or who you love, tonight I stand here in front of the world with you and for you," said Leto is his acceptance speech.

Cate Blanchett, best-actress winner for her bitter, ruined socialite in Woody Allen's "Blue Jasmine," used her acceptance speech to trumpet the need to make films with female leads - films like her own and like "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock. A study by analyst Kevin B. Lee found that last year's lead actors averaged 100 minutes on screen, but lead actresses averaged only 49 minutes.

"To the audiences who went to see the film and perhaps those of us in the industry who are still foolishly clinging to the idea that female films, with women at the center, are niche experiences, they are not," said Blanchett. "Audiences want to see them and, in fact, they earn money."

"12 Years a Slave" also won awards in the writing and acting categories. John Ridley picked up the trophy for best adapted screenplay, which was based on the 1853 memoir by Solomon Northup. The screenwriter is only the second black writer (Geoffrey Fletcher won for "Precious" in 2009) to win in the category. Backstage, the "12 Years" team mentioned their efforts to include Solomon Northup's memoir as part of high school study. The National School Boards Association announced in February that the book is now mandatory reading.

"It's important that we understand our history so we can understand who we were and who we are now and most importantly who we're going to be," said Brad Pitt, who produced "12 Years." "We hope that this film remains a gentle reminder that we're all equal. We all want the same: Dignity and opportunity."

Lupita Nyong'o was a first-time Oscar winner for her supporting role as field slave Patsey in "12 Years." "I'm a little dazed," said Nyong'o backstage of winning the Oscar. "I can't believe this is real life."

Nyong'o is the sixth black actress to win in the supporting actress category, following Hattie McDaniel ("Gone with the Wind"), Whoopi Goldberg ("Ghost"), Jennifer Hudson ("Dreamgirls"), Mo'Nique ("Precious") and Octavia Spencer ("The Help").

In her second time hosting, openly gay Ellen DeGeneres sought to make celebrities more like plain folk. She passed out slices of pizza to the front rows at the Dolby Theatre, then passed the hat to pay for it. She also tweeted a "selfie" with such stars as Meryl Streep, Julie Roberts, Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, Pitt and Nyong'o. The shot "made history," DeGeneres told the audience later. It's since been retweeted more than two million times.


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