Health

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2017 file photo, Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor leaves U.S. District Court in Phoenix. He had been charged with leading a conspiracy to bribe doctors to prescribe an opioid pain medication for people who didn't need it. Kapoor is scheduled for arraignment Thursday, Nov. 16, in federal court Boston. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
November 16, 2017 - 12:24 pm
BOSTON (AP) — The founder of a pharmaceutical company accused of leading a conspiracy to bribe doctors to prescribe a powerful opioid pain medication for people who didn't need it has pleaded not guilty. Attorney Brian Kelly told reporters after John Kapoor's arraignment in Boston's federal...
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November 16, 2017 - 12:22 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — A stressed Gulf War veteran who set himself on fire outside a Veterans Affairs clinic and later died went nearly a year without a mental health appointment or medication, one of several serious problems government investigators found with the clinic in a report released...
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Pope Francis greets an unidentified man during a surprise visit to a small facility near St. Peter's Square where doctors on a volunteer basis give poor people medical exams, at the Vatican, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2017. Francis on Thursday decried that, increasingly, only the privileged can afford sophisticated medical treatments and urged lawmakers to ensure that health care laws protect the “common good.” (L'Osservatore Romano/Pool Photo via AP)
November 16, 2017 - 12:02 pm
VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis on Thursday urged lawmakers to ensure that health care laws protect the "common good," decrying the fact that in many places only the privileged can afford sophisticated medical treatments. The comments came as U.S. lawmakers in Washington, D.C., have been debating...
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November 16, 2017 - 11:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. military would gain new options for speeding reviews of medical products for soldiers on the battlefield under a legislative compromise passed by Congress. But the Food and Drug Administration would remain the only federal agency capable of approving new medical products...
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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., points to boxes of petitions supporting the Republican tax reform bill that is set for a vote later this week as he arrives for a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
November 16, 2017 - 10:44 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans drove a near $1.5 trillion tax overhaul toward House passage Thursday, even as Senate GOP dissenters emerged in a sign that party leaders had problems to resolve before Congress could give President Donald Trump his first legislative triumph. Trump was heading to the...
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This photo provided by the San Joaquin County Sheriff's office shows Randall Saito being arrested in Stockton, Calif., Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. Saito, who escaped from a psychiatric hospital in Hawaii, was captured as the result of a tip from a taxi cab driver. (San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office via AP)
November 16, 2017 - 9:07 am
HONOLULU (AP) — More than a dozen escapes have occurred over the past eight years at a Hawaii psychiatric hospital where a patient described as dangerous walked off the grounds and made it to California before he was captured this week. Many of the 17 escapes between 2010 and this year happened...
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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., points to boxes of petitions supporting the Republican tax reform bill that is set for a vote later this week as he arrives for a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
November 16, 2017 - 8:16 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are muscling their massive tax bill through the House, with President Donald Trump urging them on to a critically needed legislative victory and GOP House leaders exuding confidence they have the votes. But the tax overhaul hit a roadblock Wednesday as Sen. Ron Johnson...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Alva Campbell. The Ohio Parole Board on Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, rejected a request for mercy from Campbell, a condemned inmate who argues he had such a bad childhood and is in such poor health that he should be spared from execution next month. The board's 11-1 decision came in the case of Campbell, set to die by lethal injection on Nov. 15 for killing a teen during a 1997 carjacking. The slaying came five years after he was paroled on a different murder charge. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)
November 16, 2017 - 5:16 am
LUCASVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Ohio called off the execution of an ailing 69-year-old killer Wednesday after the executioners couldn't find a vein to insert the IV that delivers the lethal drugs. It was only the third time in modern U.S. history that an execution attempt was halted after the process had...
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In this Nov. 13, 2017, photo, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, arrives as the tax-writing panel begins work on overhauling the nation's tax code, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Millions would forgo coverage if Congress repeals the unpopular requirement that Americans get health insurance, gambling with their own wellbeing and boosting premiums for others. Just as important, the drive by GOP senators to undo “Obamacare’s” coverage requirement fits in with Trump administration efforts to write regulations allowing for plans with limited benefits and lower premiums. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
November 16, 2017 - 3:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions are expected to skip coverage if Congress repeals the unpopular requirement that Americans get health insurance. Many are gambling that they won't get sick but their actions will boost premiums for others. The drive by Senate Republicans to undo the coverage requirement...
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November 16, 2017 - 3:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government says the uninsured rate is holding steady, with about 9 percent of Americans lacking coverage in the first six months of this year. That's nearly 29 million people, about the same as in 2016. Although progress in reducing the number of uninsured has stalled,...
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