Science

This image made available by NASA on Thursday, May 25, 2017, and made from data captured by the Juno spacecraft shows Jupiter's south pole. The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. The cyclones are separate from Jupiter's trademark Great Red Spot, a raging hurricane-like storm south of the equator. The composite, enhanced color image was made from data on three separate orbits. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles via AP)
May 25, 2017 - 6:55 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Monstrous cyclones are churning over Jupiter's poles, until now a largely unexplored region that is more turbulent than scientists expected. NASA's Juno spacecraft spotted the chaotic weather at the top and bottom of Jupiter once it began skimming the cloud tops last...
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This image made available by NASA on Thursday, May 25, 2017, and made from data captured by the Juno spacecraft shows Jupiter's south pole. The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. The cyclones are separate from Jupiter's trademark Great Red Spot, a raging hurricane-like storm south of the equator. The composite, enhanced color image was made from data on three separate orbits. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles via AP)
May 25, 2017 - 5:41 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Monstrous cyclones are churning over Jupiter's poles, until now a largely unexplored region that is more turbulent than scientists expected. NASA's Juno spacecraft spotted the chaotic weather at the top and bottom of Jupiter once it began skimming the cloud tops last...
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In this Sept. 14, 2014 photo, honeybees work in a hive located in an apple grove at Hartland Orchard, a family farm near the the Blue Ridge Mountains in Markham, Va. A U.S. survey of beekeepers released on Thursday, May 25, 2017 found improvements in the outlook for troubled honeybees. Winter losses were at the lowest levels in more than a decade with only 21 percent of the colonies dying.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
May 25, 2017 - 9:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — There's a glimmer of hope for America's ailing honeybees as winter losses were the lowest in more than a decade, according to a U.S. survey of beekeepers released Thursday. Beekeepers lost 21 percent of their colonies over last winter, the annual Bee Informed Partnership survey...
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This photo supplied by Rocket Lab, shows the Electron rocket maneuvers to the launch pad on the Mahia Peninsula in the North Island of New Zealand, Thursday, May 25, 2017. California-based company Rocket Lab said Thursday it had launched a test rocket into space from its New Zealand launch pad, although the rocket didn’t reach orbit as hoped. (Rocket Lab via AP)
May 25, 2017 - 2:13 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — California-based company Rocket Lab said Thursday it had launched a test rocket into space from its New Zealand launch pad, although the rocket didn't reach orbit as hoped. The company said its Electron rocket lifted off at 4:20 p.m. Thursday and reached space three...
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FILE - This April 15, 2017 file photo shows marijuana plants on display at a medical marijuana provider in downtown Los Angeles. A new study released on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 about using a marijuana ingredient to treat epilepsy joins a limited record of scientific knowledge about the harms and benefits of pot. Experts have called for a national effort to learn more about pot and its chemical cousins. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
May 24, 2017 - 5:42 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new marijuana study joins a limited record of scientific knowledge about the harms and benefits of pot. The research published Wednesday is the first rigorous test of a marijuana compound in treating a certain form of severe epilepsy. It found that an ingredient of marijuana — one...
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This undated photo provided by Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology shows a seismic station installed at Anaktuvak Pass in Alaska's Brooks Range. The station sends out earthquake information in real time. A seismometer rests at the bottom of a borehole and a fiberglass hut equipped with solar panels protects the station power system, electronics and radio telemetry equipment. (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology via AP)
May 24, 2017 - 3:06 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska averages 40,000 earthquakes per year, with more large quakes than the other 49 states combined, and America's shakiest state is about to have its ground examined like never before. A federal agency that supports basic science research is completing installation in...
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In this photo taken July 9, 2014, humpback whales feed at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary off Cape Cod near Provincetown, Mass. A new study explains how the baleen whale family, which includes humpback whales, grew seemingly suddenly only a few million years ago from smaller creatures to the ocean giants they are now. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
May 23, 2017 - 9:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. That's big, but you could still hold a fossil skull in two hands. Then seemingly overnight, one type...
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May 23, 2017 - 7:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. That's big, but you could still hold a fossil skull in two hands. Then seemingly overnight, one type...
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May 23, 2017 - 7:27 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Spacewalking astronauts are making urgent repairs at the International Space Station. Commander Peggy Whitson and Jack Fischer went out Tuesday morning, three days after a critical relay box abruptly stopped working. Even though a second unit managed the data load just...
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This July 23, 2014, photo provided by University of Yamanashi shows a white mouse foster mother with pups. Freeze-dried mice sperm samples were launched in 2013 to the International Space Station and returned to Earth in 2014. The intense radiation of space caused slight DNA damage to the sperm. Yet, following in vitro fertilization on the ground, healthy offspring resulted. The baby mice grew into adults with normal fertility of their own. (Sayaka Wakayama/University of Yamanashi via AP)
May 22, 2017 - 10:35 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — After nine months in space, mouse sperm has yielded healthy mice, Japanese scientists reported Monday. The freeze-dried sperm samples were launched in 2013 to the International Space Station and returned to Earth in 2014. The intense radiation of space caused slight DNA...
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