Science

This undated photo released by Mexico's National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH), shows divers from the Great Mayan Aquifer project exploring the Sac Actun underwater cave system where Mayan and Pleistocene bones and cultural artifacts have been found submerged, near Tulum, Mexico. Mexican experts said Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, that the recently mapped Sac Actun cave system "is probably the most important underwater archaeological site in the world," but is threatened by pollution. (Jan Arild Aaserud/Great Mayan Aquifer Project-INAH via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 7:32 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Pollution is threatening the recently mapped Sac Actun cave system in the Yucatan Peninsula, a vast underground network that experts in Mexico say could be the most important underwater archaeological site in the world. Subaquatic archaeologist Guillermo de Anda said the cave...
Read More
This undated photo released by Mexico's National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH), shows divers from the Great Mayan Aquifer project exploring the Sac Actun underwater cave system where Mayan and Pleistocene bones and cultural artifacts have been found submerged, near Tulum, Mexico. Mexican experts said Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, that the recently mapped Sac Actun cave system "is probably the most important underwater archaeological site in the world," but is threatened by pollution. (Jan Arild Aaserud/Great Mayan Aquifer Project-INAH via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 5:13 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Pollution is threatening the recently mapped Sac Actun cave system in the Yucatan Peninsula, a vast underground network that experts in Mexico say could be the most important underwater archaeological site in the world. Subaquatic archaeologist Guillermo de Anda said the cave...
Read More
In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 5:02 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers say they're working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah (WIH'-duh) Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, publicly displayed the bone Monday. The...
Read More
FILE - The Aug. 7, 2017 file photo shows Mount Katahdin at dawn, just west of the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, a site administered by the U.S. Interior Department near Patten, Maine. A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and repeated complaints that dissenting views have been sidelined. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
February 19, 2018 - 12:37 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and a sweeping reorganization proposed for its 70,000 employees. The evolving...
Read More
School children walk as Mount Sinabung erupts in Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra has shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes. The volcano, one of three currently erupting in Indonesia, was dormant for four centuries before exploding in 2010.(AP Photo/Sarianto)
February 19, 2018 - 3:25 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes on Monday. There were no fatalities or injuries from the morning eruption, the National...
Read More
In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 18, 2018 - 10:53 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers are set to discuss their efforts to determine whether human bones recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck are those of the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, says it also will publicly display the bones for...
Read More
FILE - This Jan. 2018 file photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a bear, injured in a wildfire, resting with its badly burned paws wrapped in fish skin - tilapia - and covered in corn husks during treatment at the University of California, Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in Davis, Calif. Two female bears badly burned in a wildfire are back home in the Los Padres National Forest. KABC-TV reports recent photos and GPS tracking show the bears are moving around and in good health in the forest after suffering burn injuries in December from a massive wildfire that affected Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. The bears were released back into the wild in January. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File)
February 18, 2018 - 3:19 pm
GOLETA, Calif. (AP) — Officials tracking two bears that were badly burned in the largest wildfire in California history say the animals are settling back into their home in the wild after receiving unusual treatment for their injured paws. Recent photos and GPS tracking data show the female bears...
Read More
FILE- In this October 2017 file photo, a black bear walks in Granite Basin, amid low-lying blueberry thickets, in Juneau, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
February 17, 2018 - 1:20 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear leave scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be. A study by Oregon State University researchers concludes that brown and black bears, and not birds, as commonly thought, are primary distributers of small fruit seeds in...
Read More
In this 2014 image from a remote camera trap provided by Taal Levi, a black bear eats devil's club berries near Haines, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (Taal Levi and Laurie Harrer via AP)
February 17, 2018 - 12:12 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be. A study by Oregon State University researchers concludes that brown and black bears, and not birds, as commonly thought, are primary distributers of small fruit seeds in...
Read More
In this 2014 image from a remote camera trap provided by Taal Levi, a black bear eats devil's club berries near Haines, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (Taal Levi and Laurie Harrer via AP)
February 17, 2018 - 11:30 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their...
Read More

Pages