Science

FILE - In this Tuesday, April 18, 2017, file photo, Alaska Gov. Bill Walker addresses reporters during a news conference in Juneau, Alaska. The state of Alaska will attempt to advance a multibillion dollar natural gas pipeline project with the help of interests from China. Walker said the agreement signed late Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, is with Sinopec, China Investment Corp. and the Bank of China. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer, File)
November 09, 2017 - 8:20 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The latest push in a decadeslong effort to commercialize vast stores of Alaska's natural gas got a boost when the state announced a deal with three Chinese companies. But the $43 billion project is far from reality. The agreement advances a project to move gas through a...
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FILE - This May 5, 2016, file photo provided by Global Supertanker Services shows a Boeing 747 making a demonstration water drop at Colorado Springs Airport in Colorado Springs, Colo. The giant passenger jet converted to fight wildfires but grounded by U.S. officials during much of this year's fire season could be aloft much more next year. The U.S. Government Accountability Office on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017, sided with Global SuperTanker Services in its protest against the U.S. Forest Service. The Colorado-based company challenged the Forest Service's 5,000-gallon (19,000-liter) limit on air tankers that kept the 19,000-gallon (72,000-liter) Boeing 747-400 idle until late August. After that it flew only in California. (Hiroshi Ando/Global Super Tanker Services LLC via AP, File)
November 09, 2017 - 5:28 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A giant passenger jet converted to fight wildfires was grounded this year by U.S. officials during much of what turned out to be an especially destructive U.S. fire season, but it could be flying much more next year. The U.S. Government Accountability Office on Thursday sided...
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FILE - This March 25, 2011, file photo shows dry cracked mud along the banks of the Rio Grande at Big Bend National Park in Texas during one of the strongest La Nina years on record. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 that a weak La Nina has formed and is expected to stick around for several months. (AP Photo/Mike Graczyk, File)
November 09, 2017 - 11:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — La Nina, the cool flip side to El Nino, has returned, forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said a weak La Nina has formed and is expected to stick around for several months. La Nina is a natural cooling of parts of the Pacific that alters...
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FILE - This March 25, 2011, file photo shows dry cracked mud along the banks of the Rio Grande at Big Bend National Park in Texas during one of the strongest La Nina years on record. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 that a weak La Nina has formed and is expected to stick around for several months. (AP Photo/Mike Graczyk, File)
November 09, 2017 - 9:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — La Nina, the cool flip side to El Nino, is returning for a second straight winter, forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said a weak La Nina has formed and is expected to stick around for several months. La Nina is a natural cooling of...
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FILE - This March 25, 2011, file photo shows dry cracked mud along the banks of the Rio Grande at Big Bend National Park in Texas during one of the strongest La Nina years on record. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 that a weak La Nina has formed and is expected to stick around for several months. (AP Photo/Mike Graczyk, File)
November 09, 2017 - 9:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Forecasters say La Nina, the cool flip side to El Nino, is returning for a second straight winter. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday a weak La Nina has formed and is expected to stick around for several months. La Nina is a natural cooling of parts...
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ADDS SOURCE RUHR UNIVERSITY BOCHUM - In this Oct. 18, 2017, photo provided by Ruhr University, doctors lift up a sheet of skin in a lab at St Josef-Hospital in Bochum, Germany. Doctors treating a critically ill boy with a devastating skin disease used experimental gene therapy to create an entirely new skin for him. Two years ago, the boy was admitted to a German hospital, with blisters all over his body. In an experiment, doctors took a small sample of the boy’s skin and added a normal version of the bad gene to his skin cells. They grew new sheets of skin in the lab and transplanted those onto the boy. Details of the case were published Wednesday, Nov. 8. (Mirko Wache/Ruhr University Bochum via AP)
November 08, 2017 - 8:52 pm
LONDON (AP) — Doctors treating a critically ill boy with a devastating skin disease used experimental gene therapy to create an entirely new skin for most of his body in a desperate attempt to save his life. Two years later, the doctors report the boy is doing so well that he doesn't need any...
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November 08, 2017 - 4:50 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Advocates for keeping the night skies dark are gathering in one of the most light-polluted cities in the country: Boston. The International Dark-Sky Association is holding its annual meeting starting Friday at a hotel in Boston's affluent Back Bay neighborhood. The Tucson, Arizona-...
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Kirstjen Nielsen testifies during a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs committee hearing on her nomination to be Department of Homeland Security Secretary, Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 08, 2017 - 3:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's choice to head the Department of Homeland Security said Wednesday that she believes climate change exists, but said she cannot determine whether humans are the primary cause. Speaking at her Senate confirmation hearing, Kirstjen Nielsen said she is "not...
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November 08, 2017 - 3:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to serve as his top environmental adviser said Wednesday that she is unconvinced by a new U.S. government assessment reaffirming that man-made carbon emissions are the primary cause of climate change. Kathleen Hartnett White testified before a...
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This illustration made available by the European Southern Observatory in 2014 shows shows dust surrounding a supernova explosion. On Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, astronomers reported that a star 500 million light-years away exploded in 1954 and apparently again in 2014. The research confounds scientists who thought they knew how dying stars ticked. (M. Kornmesser/ESO via AP)
November 08, 2017 - 2:28 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Death definitely becomes this star. Astronomers reported Wednesday on a massive, distant star that exploded in 2014 — and also, apparently back in 1954. This is one supernova that refuses to bite the cosmic dust, confounding scientists who thought they knew how dying...
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