Science

August 08, 2017 - 4:00 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A call by Republican Gov. John Kasich for scientific breakthroughs to help solve the opioid crisis is drawing interest from dozens of groups with ideas including remote controlled medication dispensers, monitoring devices for addicts, mobile apps and pain-relieving massage...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2013 file photo, male greater sage grouse perform mating rituals for a female grouse, not pictured, on a lake outside Walden, Colo. President Donald Trump’s administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the West. Wildlife advocates warn that the proposed changes would undercut a hard-won struggle to protect the greater sage grouse. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
August 08, 2017 - 3:24 pm
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the U.S. West. Wildlife advocates warned that the proposed changes would undercut a...
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FILE - In this Sept. 23, 2014, file photo, vehicles negotiate heavily flooded streets as rain falls in Miami Beach, Fla. Certain neighborhoods regularly experience flooding during heavy rains and extreme high tides. Directly contradicting President Donald Trump, a draft report produced by 13 federal agencies concludes that the United States is already feeling the negative impacts of climate change, with a stark increase in the frequency of heat waves and other extreme weather events over the last four decades. The assessment said global temperatures will continue to rise without steep reductions in burning fossil fuels, with increasingly negative impacts. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
August 08, 2017 - 3:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Directly contradicting President Donald Trump, a draft report produced by 13 federal agencies concludes that the United States is already feeling the negative impacts of climate change, with a stark increase in the frequency of heat waves, heavy rains and other extreme weather...
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In this May 13, 2017 photo, an activist holds a sign during a protest outside Sea Life Park in Waimanalo, Hawaii. A marine mammal that has contributed to groundbreaking science for the past 30 years is again making waves after being sold to the marine amusement park in Hawaii. Kina is a false killer whale, a large member of the dolphin family. Animal-rights activists say she deserves a peaceful retirement in an ocean-based refuge but is instead being traumatized by confinement in concrete tanks at Sea Life Park. But Kina's former Navy trainer and a longtime marine mammal researcher say no such sea sanctuaries exist, and the park is the best place for the 40-year-old toothy cetacean. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
August 08, 2017 - 2:07 pm
WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) — A Hawaii marine park's purchase of Kina, a 40-year-old false killer whale long used in echolocation research, has reignited a debate about captive marine mammals and the places that care for them. Most of the world's captive cetaceans - dolphins, whales and porpoises - are...
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In this May 13, 2017 photo, an activist holds a sign during a protest outside Sea Life Park in Waimanalo, Hawaii. A marine mammal that has contributed to groundbreaking science for the past 30 years is again making waves after being sold to the marine amusement park in Hawaii. Kina is a false killer whale, a large member of the dolphin family. Animal-rights activists say she deserves a peaceful retirement in an ocean-based refuge but is instead being traumatized by confinement in concrete tanks at Sea Life Park. But Kina's former Navy trainer and a longtime marine mammal researcher say no such sea sanctuaries exist, and the park is the best place for the 40-year-old toothy cetacean. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
August 08, 2017 - 4:29 am
WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) — A Hawaii marine park's purchase of Kina, a 40-year-old false killer whale long used in echolocation research, has reignited a debate about captive marine mammals and the places that care for them. Most of the world's captive cetaceans - dolphins, whales and porpoises - are...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2005 file photo, a sage grouse is seen near Fallon, Nev. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says a new federal plan to protect the threatened sage grouse will better align with conservation efforts in 11 Western states where the bird lives. (AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)
August 08, 2017 - 3:39 am
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the West. Wildlife advocates warn that the proposed changes would undercut a hard-won...
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August 07, 2017 - 10:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal climate report says the United States is already feeling the effects of climate change, with temperatures rising dramatically over the last four decades. That's according to The New York Times, which acquired a draft copy of the report by scientists from 13 federal...
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August 07, 2017 - 9:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal climate report says the United States is already feeling the effects of climate change, with temperatures rising dramatically over the last four decades. That's according to The New York Times, which acquired a draft copy of the report by scientists from 13 federal...
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FILE - In this June 20, 2017 file photo, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein speaks in Bethesda, Md. The Justice Department is reviving work to develop federal standards for what federal forensic experts can say in court and plans to create a program to monitor the accuracy of forensic testimony. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 07, 2017 - 3:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is trying to shore up faltering confidence in forensic science and how its experts describe their findings in court, a push that comes months after similar efforts dating to the Obama administration were suspended. The department said Monday it is reviving...
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FILE - In this June 20, 2017 file photo, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein speaks in Bethesda, Md. The Justice Department is reviving work to develop federal standards for what federal forensic experts can say in court and plans to create a program to monitor the accuracy of forensic testimony. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 07, 2017 - 2:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is trying to shore up faltering confidence in forensic science and how its experts describe their findings in court, a push that comes months after similar efforts dating to the Obama administration were derailed. The department said Monday it is reviving...
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