International law

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue, Vice-President of Equatorial Guinea, speaks during the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. A legal battle between France and Equatorial Guinea over the corruption prosecution of the African nation’s vice president is back before the International Court of Justice, months after a Paris court convicted the vice president. French lawyers on Monday Feb. 19, 2018 told judges that the court, the United Nations’ highest judicial organ, has no jurisdiction to rule in a 2016 case filed by Equatorial Guinea which argues that Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue has immunity from prosecution. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
February 19, 2018 - 6:35 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — French lawyers on Monday urged the International Court of Justice to throw out a case brought by Equatorial Guinea in 2016 seeking to prevent the prosecution in France — which has since happened — of the African nation's vice president on money laundering and other...
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February 19, 2018 - 5:09 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A legal battle between France and Equatorial Guinea over the corruption prosecution of the African nation's vice president is back before the International Court of Justice, months after a Paris court convicted the vice president. French lawyers said Monday that the...
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A U.S. Marine stands guard on the flight deck of the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier anchors off Manila, Philippines, for a five-day port call along with guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. Lt. Cmdr. Tim Hawkins told The Associated Press that American forces will continue to patrol the South China Sea wherever international law allows when asked if China's newly built islands could restrain them in the disputed waters. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
February 17, 2018 - 8:08 pm
ABOARD USS CARL VINSON, Philippines (AP) — U.S. forces are undeterred by China's military buildup on man-made islands in the South China Sea and will continue patrolling the strategic, disputed waters wherever "international law allows us," said a Navy officer aboard a mammoth U.S. aircraft carrier...
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U.S. military aircraft sit on the deck of the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier anchors off Manila, Philippines, for a five-day port call along with guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. Lt. Cmdr. Tim Hawkins told The Associated Press that American forces will continue to patrol the South China Sea wherever international law allows when asked if China's newly built islands could restrain them in the disputed waters. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
February 17, 2018 - 5:52 am
ABOARD USS CARL VINSON, Philippines (AP) — A Navy officer aboard a mammoth U.S. aircraft carrier brimming with F18 fighter jets said Saturday that American forces would continue to patrol the South China Sea wherever "international law allows us" when asked if China's newly built islands could...
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U.S. military aircraft sit on the deck of the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier anchors off Manila, Philippines, for a five-day port call along with guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. Lt. Cmdr. Tim Hawkins told The Associated Press that American forces will continue to patrol the South China Sea wherever international law allows when asked if China's newly built islands could restrain them in the disputed waters. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
February 17, 2018 - 5:03 am
ABOARD USS CARL VINSON, Philippines (AP) — A Navy officer aboard a mammoth U.S. aircraft carrier brimming with F18 fighter jets said American forces will continue to patrol the South China Sea wherever "international law allows us" when asked if China's newly built islands could restrain them in...
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In this Friday, Feb. 9, 2018 photo, Hussain Razaee, whose fiancee was among 30 people killed last July when a Taliban suicide bomber rammed his explosives-packed car into a bus carrying employees of the Ministry of Mines, gives an interview to The Associated Press in Kabul, Afghanistan. Abdul Wadood Pedram, of the Kabul-based Human Rights and Eradication of Violence Organization said, the statements not only include accounts of alleged atrocities by groups like the Taliban and the Islamic State, but also by Afghan Security Forces and government-affiliated warlords, the U.S.-led coalition, and foreign and domestic spy agencies. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)
February 15, 2018 - 3:38 pm
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Since the International Criminal Court began collecting material three months ago for a possible war crimes case involving Afghanistan, it has gotten a staggering 1.17 million statements from Afghans who say they were victims. The statements include accounts of alleged...
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FILE - In this Nov. 27, 2013, file photo, prosecutor Fatou Bensouda waits for the start of the trial at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands. Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court Fatou Bensouda says she is opening preliminary probes into alleged crimes by police and security forces in the Philippines and Venezuela. Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said in a statement Thursday Feb. 8, 2018. that the Philippines probe will focus on allegations since July 2016 that thousands of people have been killed in the government's war on drugs. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
February 08, 2018 - 8:06 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court announced Thursday that she is opening preliminary probes into alleged crimes by police and security forces in the Philippines and Venezuela. Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said that the probe on Venezuela will look at...
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A woman scrolls the electoral list in search of her voting table location during the presidential election in San Jose, Costa Rica, Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018. Costa Ricans voted Sunday in a presidential race shaken by an international court ruling saying the country should let same-sex couples get married. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)
February 04, 2018 - 3:56 pm
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica (AP) — Costa Ricans voted Sunday in a presidential race shaken by an international court ruling saying the country should let same-sex couples get married. Evangelical candidate Fabricio Alvarado recently vaulted into first place in the polls after he took a strong stance...
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Presidential candidates, from left, Antonio Alvarez Desanti of the National Liberation party, Carlos Alvarado Quesada of the Citizen Action party, Rodolfo Hernandez Gomez of the Social Christian Republican party, Rodolfo Piza of the Social Christian Unity party, Juan Diego Castro of the National Integration party, and Fabricio Alvarado of the National Restoration party, stand on the stage before a live, televised debate ahead of the presidential election, in San Jose, Costa Rica, Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018. If no candidate tops 40 percent in the Sunday vote, the first two finishers advance to a runoff scheduled for April 1. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)
February 03, 2018 - 11:50 pm
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica (AP) — An international court ruling saying Costa Rica should allow same-sex marriage has upended the Central American nation's presidential race, turning an evangelical candidate who opposes it from an also-ran with just 2 percent support into the leading contender in Sunday's...
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Presidential candidates, from left, Antonio Alvarez Desanti of the National Liberation party, Carlos Alvarado Quesada of the Citizen Action party, Rodolfo Hernandez Gomez of the Social Christian Republican party, Rodolfo Piza of the Social Christian Unity party, Juan Diego Castro of the National Integration party, and Fabricio Alvarado of the National Restoration party, stand on the stage before a live, televised debate ahead of the presidential election, in San Jose, Costa Rica, Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018. If no candidate tops 40 percent in the Sunday vote, the first two finishers advance to a runoff scheduled for April 1. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)
February 03, 2018 - 12:02 am
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica (AP) — An international court ruling saying Costa Rica should allow same-sex marriage has upended the Central American nation's presidential race, turning an evangelical candidate who opposes it from an also-ran with just 2 percent in the polls into the leading contender in...
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